Clicker Training

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Clicker Training

Post  Jo on Sun Jun 07, 2009 12:17 pm

I just wondered who here trains their dog(s) with a clicker? If you do use one, what sort of things do you train?

I often start mine off learning the sendaway (sending the dog ahead of you to a marker) as their first experience with a clicker.

I find it great for dogs who struggle with stays, as it sound gives them a definite end of the exercise and it can make it easier to progress to longer stays with a steady dog.

I also like to sometimes use one to allow the dog to suggest a trick to me (free form) the last trick was with my Giant who decided to offer the behaviour of lowering her head, and this was extended to her doing it in a down, so she looks like she is asleep!


I've known a few people use clickers with their show dogs, but they have used them wrong - just as a noise to get the dogs attention when in the ring Rolling Eyes
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Re: Clicker Training

Post  MsBritmor on Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:01 pm

We have clicker-trained here now for about ten years, and we don't use an actual clicker... we click using our tongue on the roof of our mouths. That method is always at the ready, and both hands are free!

Many years ago, my daughter Katie decided to join her best friend and her new puppy in a beginner obedience class. The training center offered both clicker and regular training, and I talked Katie into taking the clicker class so that we could learn more about it. Katie picked one of our dogs, Witch, to start working with. Witchie was about seven years old, and a natural retriever.

A friend of mine told me to start conditioning the dog the week before the class, and since I was the one who fed the dogs, I started working with the dog. I clicked (my tongue), fed; clicked, fed... through the entire bowl of food. Halfway through the second day, I was bored spitless, so I started waiting until Witch was giving me eye contact. When Katie started class a week later, she HAD eye contact<G> Wherever Katie turned, Witch would move to sit in front of her to maintain eye contact. As the training progressed, I was working with Witch and her bowl of food every morning, but eventually, Katie and I were butting heads (as usual) over how to train the dog, so I stopped doing obedience and starting training Witch some tricks.

Witch would sit, lie down (drop), beg, wave, shake hands, roll over (left and right), play dead (after being shot), and her best trick was to "clean the house". She would pick up her toys and put them in a basket. She probably did a few other things, but I really cannot remember now. Witch got her first level obedience title (Companion Dog), and right after that began agility... entering her first trial after six months of training. http://britmorschnauzers.com/witch.html

In 2005, I got the urge to start training a dog again, and since our schnauzer club needed a program in October, I decided to start clicker-training a dog and demonstrate how far I could get with that dog in 30 days. Here is what I did:

Ace's Training Journal

As a side note, I finished Ace's Rally Advanced Excellent title and then quit working with him because of my back issues. I **REALLY** should start training that dog again; he really does want to work.

So this weekend, I had entered two young males in conformation to help make major points for this weekend. Cruise is Katie's next agility dog, and she has clicker-trained him. Saturday after my brain started working, I started working with him before we entered the ring. He was clicked/treated for giving me eye contact (and ears!) and standing correctly in front of me (we call that "baiting" here). By the time we came out of the ring, I was thrilled with his behavior!

I will say that I LOVE clicker for training a dog, but I am most definitely NOT a purist. I believe the dog learns quicker by also being *shown* what it is that you want him to do. I also firmly believe that once a dog KNOWS what it is that you want (ie. come), that he can make a conscious decision to either do the exercise or NOT do the exercise (just like a small child). **IF** the dog **KNOWS** what it is that I want him to do and he decides NOT to do it, I will correct the dog. I never correct if it is something that the dog is learning.

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Karen Brittan, Minnesota, USA
Britmor Miniature Schnauzers


Pedigree indicates what the animal should be.
Conformation indicates what the animal appears to be.
But performance indicates what the animal actually is.
-Author Unknown-
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Re: Clicker Training

Post  Szende on Tue Jun 09, 2009 9:05 am

I also use to mix the sound of the clicker or the tongue and showing the dog what to do. My male really decides if he want to do what I ask, and I know that he really know what to do. Sometimes he gives me a look, that I don't want to do that, but I am doing it for you.... but we have a problem.
I can't correct him with walking on the leash while walking. In the ring, we have no problems, only on street. Everything is very interesting and he just starts pulling whenever I am not attentive enough. But I know that he is aware of the task, he proves it for a very short time after giving him the commend to walk but then everything starts over again. He is 9 month old now. I would be happy to read some suggestions.
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Re: Clicker Training

Post  Safina on Tue Jun 09, 2009 2:13 pm

I do )) Dogs love it. The dog is more interested in your tone than your exact words. If we are too tired or fed up to say 'good dog' in a happy tone of voice, he/she thinks he's/she's mucked up. A clicker's tone is always the same. Another advantage is that the click is very short and it's wonderful for shows or some dangerous situations)) when you don't have a lot of time. I like use it and when I just take it in hands - they are ready to work))) Very Happy Very Happy Very Happy
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Re: Clicker Training

Post  SchnauzkyLVR on Fri Nov 20, 2009 1:45 am

very useful information! i think it is a good way to train dogs Smile
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Re: Clicker Training

Post  Margit349 on Fri Nov 20, 2009 9:42 am

Hello Friends.

I also train my Desperado with clicker .... and this weekend we start at your first working test! Cool

Dog is bombatisc - but i am soooo nervous.

I hope my nerves hold on Embarassed

Cross your fingers for me - please!!!

I want to tell you that Clicker - don't matter if with tongue or Clicker - i personally use Clicker - but i think that is a great thing ...

For example: Without clicker Despe walk with me and hold the position, yes he do - but he don't look high to me - with clicker he hold the postion while walking and he look high to me - he makes no misstakes he is friendly and he have fun.

And that i love ... an he too - it is easyer to teach things because you can bring things on the point!
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Re: Clicker Training

Post  Gast on Fri Nov 20, 2009 11:55 am

In my last flat I had a carpet. When Lilly arrived in the end of march this year, I had to hurry up for making her housebroken.
I decided to use a clicker, she was 8 weeks and a few days old, you cannot imagine, after 5 days she was totally housetrained!

I used a clicker before, my last dog was able to do about 70 tricks. He was a really good dog for TV, unfortunatly I never tried to show him that way.

Now I am using a clicker for shows and train my dogs to bring anything I want when pointed with a laserpointer. She is very different in learning, its so funny. At the beginning I thought, she is not that clever, but she has her own way to learn. When I am teaching her anything, she never do it, like she is not understanding what I want. On next day or few days later, when I ask her to do it, she is doing it at once!! scratch

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Re: Clicker Training

Post  marksmith on Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:13 pm

Operant conditioning is the way any animal (including the human kind) interacts with and learns from its environment. Simply put, an animal tends to repeat an action that has a positive consequence and tends not to repeat one that has a negative consequence. Trainers can take advantage of that natural tendency by providing positive reinforcement following an action that they want the animal to repeat. In order for the animal to connect the positive reinforcement to the behavior that he is doing, the reinforcement must happen AS the behavior is occurring, not afterwards. The actual reinforcement can't always be gotten to the animal at that precise instant, however.

Trainers needed to find another way of letting the animal know that he was doing the right thing, so they began using a conditioned reinforcer. A conditioned reinforcer is anything that wouldn't ordinarily be something the animal would work to get. A primary reinforcer, on the other hand, is something that the animal automatically finds reinforcing, such as food or water. When a conditioned reinforcer is paired with a primary reinforcer, they become of equal importance to the animal. Enter the clicker as a conditioned reinforcer.

The Clicker is a small plastic box with a metal strip that makes a sharp, clicking sound when pushed and released. Its value is that the unique sound doesn't get lost in the babble of words we are constantly throwing at our dogs. It is faster than saying "Good dog!" and allows the trainer to mark with great precision the behavior for which the dog is being reinforced. Paired with something the animal finds very reinforcing, the clicker becomes a powerful tool for shaping behavior.

When you shape behavior, you reinforce closer and closer approximations of the actual behavior you are looking for. For instance, if you are trying to teach your dog to "shake hands" you would click and treat at first if he simply raised his paw just a bit off the ground. As you progressed, you would stop reinforcing a slight raise of the paw. You would now require that the paw is raised higher, and then the paw would have to come towards you, etc. Breaking the behavior down into TINY steps allows progress to be made quickly.

Thanks

http://www.ecigarette.org/

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Re: Clicker Training

Post  alexigo on Sat Apr 02, 2011 3:02 pm

Hi,
I use clicker in our training and I think, this is a great thing at the schnauzers mostly by the new execises.
Here is a video, the 2 standard puppies worked with clicker only for 4-5 times and the result....
This 2 puppies are 8,5 weeks old and they love so much this training. I hope, the new owners will work with clicker. Very Happy
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Re: Clicker Training

Post  Jo on Sat Apr 02, 2011 11:37 pm

Very nice! Such happy workers!
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Re: Clicker Training

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